Peg’s Second Chance

How an Eclectus with an amputated foot brought a hopeful end to the year
Peg Eclectus2
“An 18-week old female Eclectus was brought in today…” the veterinarian from SEAVS in Fairfax, VA said, as we spoke on the phone. “The bird’s right foot needs to be amputated and the owners did not want to pay for the surgery.”

The vet needed to find an experienced person who could care for the as-yet-unnamed female Eclectus. Someone needed to help post-surgery to medicate her and bring her back multiple times for follow-ups. Additionally, she needed to be weaned. An Eclectus should wean in no longer than 6 months. At four and a half months, this little one needed to transition to solid food.

The vet needed to find someone quickly, as her dead foot needed to be removed.  Could Phoenix Landing take her on?  Of course.

But who could take on the care of this very young, special needs parrot? Debbie, our MD adoption coordinator, stepped up to help.

First, the bird needed to survive the surgery. “We will try to leave as much of her leg as possible,” the vet assured me.

How did this happen to such a young bird? Caretaker neglect. A towel was wrapped around her leg and it was not removed for at least two weeks. Though many birds play with towels, or shred them when nesty, towels are not good toys. We have known birds who have ingested tiny bits of indigestible fabric, to the point where their digestive system was impacted and they died. Please be careful if you give your parrot a towel to play with, and always supervise.

About an hour later, the vet called and said the surgery was successful. They would care for her overnight, but the most important thing now was that she eat.

“She can’t leave until we know she is eating. We had to tube feed her.” We would talk the next day to see how she was doing.

Peg Eclectus

Peg, post-surgery at Debbie’s house, and now eating a wide variety of healthy foods!

The vet advised how to set up a cage for her. Her cage should be short, with lots of padding on the bottom. She would do well with flat perches. “She will probably adjust well to the missing foot, as she is so young,” the vet said. An Eclectus can live to be 40 years old.

It amazes me how resilient parrots are. This one was exceptional. Imagine the pain and fear this poor bird suffered in its short life. How could she ever trust humans? Native to Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and Autstralia, in the wild she would have already fledged (at 11 weeks). She would be foraging for fruits in the tops of rain forest trees. When she reaches sexual maturity between 2 and 3 years, her behavior will change drastically. She would be the queen of a harem of friendly males, a relationship described by academics as cooperative polyandry. She would sit in a hole in a tree for up to 11 months of the year, while males brought her food and helped her create and care for her clutches of 2 eggs. But instead of this life, she is in captivity, now missing a foot, and her future is uncertain.  But we will do the best we can by her. As often quoted from The Little Prince, “You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.”

The next day brought good news: the little one was walking, and was not messing with her bandages. She did not need a collar. Additionally, she was eating a little. She would be ready to go that evening.

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But what should we call her? Debbie said, “Peg!” Debbie then made the 2 hour round trip journey to pick her up, and Peg is on the road to recovery.  She will need to stay on medications and have several bandage changes before we can look for her adopting home.  Stay tuned for an update!

Kevin Blaylock, One Of A Kind

Kevin was supremely devoted to his family – his wife Kami and their children Chandler and Maddi. I remember when they joined us for a parrot care class back in July 2006, soon after they acquired their first bird, a macaw. We were so impressed with their dedication to learning right from the start, especially because the whole family was involved. For Kevin, family was everything.

DSC_0187 copyOver the years, as Kevin became more involved with Phoenix Landing, we felt like his lucky adopted family. We went on ecotour vacations together, many of which he had adeptly organized. Beginning in 2010, we spent several weekends a year teaching intense training “Step-Up” workshops. Kevin never missed one of these workshops, because he so enjoyed the time with new students and old friends.

Kevin helped us with countless projects – especially at The Landing, our only facility. StepUpKevinWhen in doubt, we would say “let’s ask Kevin” because he usually had a new and insightful idea. As a highly successful businessman, Kevin joined the Board of Directors as our Treasurer and he knew how to steer the organization solidly into the future. Lastly, Kevin took stunning photographs of amazing wild and captive parrots, something that gave him great joy and satisfaction. His love for birds just radiates through these photos.

 

Kevin’s dedication to helping parrots was monumental. Avid learners become good teachers, and Kevin was one of our best, with a special interest in behavior. He also put his positive reinforcement training skills to work in every aspect of his life, always seeing the good in everyone.

 

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Kevin’s family lost him way too soon, he was a young 44 years old. His Phoenix Landing family lost one of its brightest young stars. There are no words to convey the void Kevin leaves behind – one of goodwill, smiles and genuine affection for all those he befriended. I hope you are able to fly in your new life, Kevin, because we know how much you deserve the joy that would bring you! ~ Love always, Ann

Meet our adoption coordinators: Debbie, Maryland

Celebrating National Volunteer Week, we are sharing interviews with the Phoenix Landing adoption coordinators for different areas. Debbie has been an adoption coordinator for Phoenix Landing for a long time, and has helped Phoenix Landing help many birds over the years.

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Debbie and Joey

1. For what area are you the adoption coordinator for Phoenix Landing?
The state of Maryland.

2. How long have you served in this volunteer role?
Since February 2007, so a little over 10 years!!

3. How did you first learn about or get involved with Phoenix Landing?
In 2003, I was looking to purchase a bird or find a rescue because my son wanted his own bird. I found Phoenix Landing (PL) on-line and submitted my application to foster. After having a home visit and attending a few classes, I started fostering and never looked back. I have fostered many parrots over the years.

4. There are many causes and non-profits out there to get involved with, why did you choose this one?
I chose PL because of my love for parrots, the people I met and the education they offered. I have been involved with other pet rescues and the amount of education PL offers is amazing. I’m always learning something new!

5. What do you like most about volunteering with Phoenix Landing?
I like the fact that Phoenix Landing makes all new applicants fill out a detailed application, attend a required event and have a home visit before they will even consider placing a bird with them. Lots of people go out on a whim and get a pet and then have no idea how to care for it. I like the fact that PL takes ownership of the parrot they bring in for life and that they have a plan in place in case something ever happened to our founder, but most of all I enjoying helping parrots in need as well as helping new parrot owners acquire a pet.

6. What else would you like to share about yourself, about volunteering, or about Phoenix Landing?
I have owned my own parrots for over 30 years, but my family always had parakeets and lovebirds when I was growing up.

I currently have 9 parrots and 1 soft bill. Most were adopted from Phoenix Landing, two were adopted from Best Friends in Kanab, Utah and a couple were given to me! I have 4 macaws, a grey, a cockatoo, 2 conures, a meyers and a green aracari. Three live with my son at our beach house. Plus I have 2 rescued Italian greyhounds and a boxer.

I have found volunteering for Phoenix Landing has been very rewarding, so if you want to get involved, please contact us. We are always looking for volunteers.

Meet our adoption coordinators: Ron, Raleigh/Durham, NC

Learn more about Ron, our adoption coordinator for the Raleigh-Durham area in North Carolina in his interview below. He is one of the many volunteers who helps Phoenix Landing help parrots!

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Ron

1. For what area are you the adoption coordinator for Phoenix Landing?
Raleigh/Durham, NC

2. How long have you served in this volunteer role?
Since April 2014 (three years)

3. How did you first learn about or get involved with Phoenix Landing?
My avian veterinarian often spoke of Phoenix Landing; however, I learned the most by attending a Phoenix Landing Step-Up class. The class taught me much needed skills and increased my confidence so that I could shift my way of thinking in order to solve a behavioral issue within my own flock. Those skills kept me from having to re-home one of my parrots.

4. There are many causes and non-profits out there to get involved with, why did you choose this one?
As a parrot lover, I have always tried to learn as much as possible about how to provide my flock the best possible care. In doing so, my eyes were really opened to the many issues parrots and owners face. It was much worse than I ever imagined. As someone that has always enjoyed volunteer work, it simply made sense that I would volunteer with Phoenix Landing.

5. What do you like most about volunteering with Phoenix Landing?
I like when a neglected parrot goes to a new home where it is loved, fed a proper diet and given daily socialization and enrichment. Watching a once neglected parrot flourish is amazing as well as rewarding and exciting. It is as if they have been given a brand new life.

6. What else would you like to share about yourself, about volunteering, or about Phoenix Landing?
My involvement with Phoenix Landing has been life changing. Attending step-up may have been my introduction to Phoenix Landing; however, it was simply the catalyst to years of learning and meeting some of the most amazing friends.

Meet our adoption coordinators: Jackie, Greenville/Spartanburg, SC

The Phoenix Landing adoption coordinator for the Greenville area of South Carolina is Jackie! If you are in the Greenville area of South Carolina and are interested in either adopting a bird or becoming more involved with Phoenix Landing in order to help more birds, let us know by contacting us! Jackie shares information about volunteer opportunities with Phoenix Landing in her interview below.

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Jackie and LucyLui

1. For what area are you the adoption coordinator for Phoenix Landing? Greenville/Spartanburg, SC

2. How long have you served in this volunteer role?
5 years (I’m guessing!)

3. How did you first learn about or get involved with Phoenix Landing?
I was researching parrot agencies where I could volunteer. I came across Phoenix Landing and signed up for a STEP UP! Class and the rest is history! I adopted a parrot I worked with during STEP UP! And became more involved with transport and helping with area bird adoptions.

4. There are many causes and non-profits out there to get involved with, why did you choose this one?
Because Phoenix Landing is more about the right placement for each parrot than they are about pushing parrots out the door into any old home. The requirement for each potential adopter to take one higher-level adoption class is key and that requirement sold me on Phoenix Landing. There are people who “think” they want a parrot and after taking a class that goes into the required care, caging, enrichment, nutrition, possible noise, etc., people know what they are getting into and go into the adoption process with their eyes wide open! Also, Phoenix Landing makes sure that a particular parrot is right for the adopting person/family and that the parrot will be “happy” with the lifestyle in the new home. A loud, active home may not be a good fit for every parrot, so it is good to know that someone is not just looking to place a bird, but to place a parrot in a mutually beneficial environment with a person/family.

5. What do you like most about volunteering with Phoenix Landing?
I enjoy the variety of parrots, but most important to me is working with older parrot owners. Many older people have to make tough decisions about placing their parrots because the person is getting older, may have health issues, whatever the case may be, but they know they need to place their beloved pet in the best situation going forward. Most are so glad to know that their parrot will have a home for life within the Phoenix Landing system and that should their pet need to come back to Phoenix Landing for any reason whatsoever, it will happen. And it happens quickly so that the parrot is back in a cared for, healthy environment while we look for its next home.

6. What else would you like to share about yourself, about volunteering, or about Phoenix Landing?
I wish I were more outgoing so that I could grow the Greenville/Spartanburg parrot group! If there is anyone out there who wants to help get the word out in the Greenville/Spartanburg area, please don’t hesitate to STEP UP! There are parrot owners in this area and I want to reach them, get them involved in classes, get to talk about their parrots, and see everyone updated on parrot ownership in today’s world where nutrition, housing requirements, and enrichment of these wonderful pets is key to their health, happiness, and longevity.

Meet our adoption coordinators: Liz, Hickory, N.C.

Continuing our celebration of National Volunteer Week and the numerous volunteers who make what Phoenix Landing does, possible, today we are highlighting our Western North Carolina adoption coordinator, Liz! Liz has been volunteering with Phoenix Landing for years, but is our newest adoption coordinator, having just agreed to officially take on the role last week!

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Liz and Mango

1. For what area are you the adoption coordinator for Phoenix Landing?
Western NC, Hickory Metro, covering approximately 5 counties. My home is in Morganton NC, Burke County

2. How long have you served in this volunteer role?
Just agreed to become official last week. But have helped teach a few classes at The Landing in Asheville and with the help of our volunteer and friend Lannie Ellison, I have set up education booths at bird fairs and pet expos for the last 4 yrs.

3. How did you first learn about or get involved with Phoenix Landing?
We met them at a booth that was set up at the Pet Expo in Hickory about 7 or 8 years ago. We adopted some Bourke Parakeets that had come out of a situation in Catawba County.

4. There are many causes and non-profits out there to get involved with, why did you choose this one?
Local and common interests and viewpoints. My husband and I also work with National Shetland Sheepdog Rescue, and Carolina Great Pyrenees Rescue.

5. What do you like most about volunteering with Phoenix Landing?
It’s rewarding to meet and talk to people and educate them on the care and long term commitments to our feathered companions. I love spending time at the Landing in Asheville and am constantly learning new things.

6. What else would you like to share about yourself, about volunteering, or about Phoenix Landing?
I’m Tuki’s mom! Nuff said. HaHa And working with Ann, Mary, Kevin, Leigh Ann, Jenny, and everyone else I’ve met along the way. I consider them all personal friends.

Meet our adoption coordinators: Nina, Wilmington, NC

In honor of National Volunteer Week, we are continuing our celebration of the numerous volunteers who make what Phoenix Landing does, possible! Today we are highlighting our Wilmington, NC area adoption coordinator, Nina!

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Nina, Wilmington, NC adoption coordinator

1. For what area are you the adoption coordinator for Phoenix Landing?Wilmington, NC.

2. How long have you served in this volunteer role?
Almost 7 years.

3. How did you first learn about or get involved with Phoenix Landing?Recommendations of other parrot lovers when I was in Asheville for a veterinary conference.

4. There are many causes and non-profits out there to get involved with, why did you choose this one?
Outstanding reputation, philosophy, and focus on education.

5. What do you like most about volunteering with Phoenix Landing?
Teaching others about parrot behavior, nutrition, health, and care.

6. What else would you like to share about yourself, about volunteering, or about Phoenix Landing?
I highly recommend the “Step up” classes and the Parrot Wellness Retreat for anyone who loves parrots and wishes to expand their knowledge.

Information about the “Step Up” classes is available at http://www.phoenixlanding.org/events.html. The next Phoenix Landing Wellness Retreat will take place in 2018. Stay tuned for details!