Rain and Bow and the road to better health

Help birds like Rain and Bow through the Phoenix Landing Healthy Parrot Medical Fund! Up to $2500 in donations will be matched by generous supporters between November 15 – 23, 2019.

For information about adopting Rain and Bow, see their Petfinder profile, and information about Phoenix Landing’s Adoption process.

This is the story of Rain and Bow, two male cockatiels who came to Phoenix Landing with 34 other cockatiels in the Spring of 2017. They were initially in a group of 167 cockatiels who had been living in horrid conditions in a home in Pennsylvania. Many kind, compassionate people helped them get better. And, our hope is that someone soon will help them turn the page to begin that next chapter, by adopting them into a loving, knowledgeable, patient home.

In the beginning

After learning a shelter in Pennsylvania had received 167 cockatiels and desperately needed help placing them, Phoenix Landing’s Maryland Adoption Coordinator, Debbie Russell, and committed volunteer, Anne Hawthorn, made the trip to Pittsburg to pick up 36 of them to help. Donated supplies and cages from The Parrot Posse allowed us to house and care for so many at once. Many amazing people stepped up to adopt or foster many of these cockatiels, and provide them with a better life. Hawthorn herself graciously fostered many of them until they could be placed with other volunteers or adopters.

Finally breathing easier

Rain and Bow battled respiratory issues until August of this year when, finally, they can now breathe easier! Bow, especially, had very persistent respiratory infections. We are grateful to the knowledgeable team of experts at Stahls Exotic Animal Veterinary Services, who remained committed to helping us see them through to healthier days. Numerous appointments, diagnostics, radiographs, medicine, and more were required before they were healthy. The total amount for their veterinary bills between 2017 – 2019 is $2979.86. Over $2100 of that was from 2019. But, it got us to that happy announcement this past August that Bow seemed to have finally beat the respiratory issues that he just couldn’t seem to completely kick previously. It was, indeed, happy news to us all!

Volunteers made a huge difference in Rain and Bow’s lives

Beyond just the medical care that was needed, they needed caring, compassionate, knowledgeable volunteers to foster them. Not everyone is prepared to administer medicine to a bird who is wary of hands, and we are grateful to those who stepped up to help them, and helped them day in and day out. As such, we’d like to highlight some stories from two of their most recent fosters, about their time with Rain and Bow!

Catherine fostered Rain and Bow from 2018 through July 2019. She helped them through several respiratory issues, and brought them in for exams when there were signs something wasn’t right. She administered medicine when they were ill. She fostered them for about a year (a long time to foster), until she had upcoming changes so sought a new foster for them.

After we sent out a few requests for a new foster home for these special boys, Ava came forward, continued their care, and has been fostering them since. Bow had an especially difficult time getting over the respiratory infection. Radiographs and additional diagnostics were done, and a more aggressive, multi-prong approach was recommended to finally get him through it. It worked! Rain and Bow would not be healthy now, though, without the incredible care they received in their foster homes and at SEAVS.

We hope their next move will be to a home that hopes to adopt them! (Could that be you?)

Catherine’s Story: Fostering Rain and Bow

During the year I fostered Rain and Bow, they were pretty easy little birds. They never had night frights and readily returned to their cage for bedtime. With time and persistence, Rain eventually showed some interest in shredding toys. Overall, they are not loud, playful, or mischievous. When let out of their cage, they enjoy sitting on top of it or walking on the floor foraging. While they are fine being around other birds, they mostly prefer one another’s company. Rain and Bow are great birds that enjoy the simple pleasures of a full food bowl, fresh water, and a nightlight for bedtime.

Bow kind of takes care of Rain. I often saw Bow preening Rain, and where Rain went, Bow followed.

Because of Bow’s persistent respiratory infections, Bow had weekly showers to help his sinuses. While he wasn’t fond of them, he became accustomed to the weekly routine and accepted them.

I tried to get them to try new foods, and wheatgrass was the first one they were brave enough to try. Rain is very curious, so he was the first to try it. In fact, with time and patience, after building trust with him, Rain will take food from your hand.

Ava’s Story: Fostering Rain and Bow

Rain and Bow came across my Facebook feed as a request to help two cockatiels in Northern Virginia who needed nursing back to health.  At first, I pushed it to the back of my mind – there are lots of people who might want to help.  A few days later, I saw the request again, and tried to ignore it, telling myself that I had too much going on.  The third time I saw it, I knew it had to be me: I am in NoVa and local to SEAVS; I’ve been a bird owner almost as long as I’ve been alive; I’ve worked in multiple veterinary clinics so I’m familiar with medicating animals, dosing, signs and symptoms, etc; and finally, I’ve also done raptor rehab. I figured if I could handle hand feeding and medicating aggressive red-tailed hawks and sharp little kestrels, two cockatiels would be nothing.

I arrived at SEAVS not sure what condition to expect the birds to be in.  The vet tech went over medications and dosage, Rain scrambled around looking terrified and hyper-vigilant, and a fluffed-up Bow tried to sleep.  Meanwhile, I focused on learning their markings to tell them apart later – Bow was still sick but Rain had been cleared and would no longer need medication.  When I finally got them home and settled in, I covered their cage and began making up a daily checklist of medications for the next 14 days – pain medicine once daily, oral antibiotics twice daily, boric acid saline flush once daily (which required diluting boric acid into the saline by hand), followed by two different nasal drops administered 5 minutes later, 5 minutes apart.  I printed out my chart and wondered if I had gotten in over my head.  And then I heard one of the boys grind his beak.  I knew I’d done the right thing, and I knew the birds were going to be fine.

14 days eventually turned into nearly a month of medicating Bow, but a few days after that we were able to move them out of quarantine and began introducing them to our flock. Now they hold their own, much to my inquisitive Illiger’s chagrin, and while they are still very nervous about people, they’ve been making good strides on stepping up to be moved back and forth from cage to play stand.  Rain is vocal, and while Bow sometimes joins in, Rain can be counted on 100% to sing his song exactly when things get too quiet — like when the entire house tries to nap on a weekend!

Is a Parrot the Right Pet for Your Child?

Parrots are loud, messy and fun, probably a lot like your kids! As an adoption coordinator, I have been placing parrots for over ten years. A parrot could be an excellent companion for a child, or could be another abandoned hobby. Consider these characteristics of parrots as you decide whether a parrot is a good option for your family.

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Parrots are loud. A bird’s volume and tone can annoy some people. Be sure you know what the species sounds like before you bring the bird home. If your family needs quiet time – for napping, for example – birds may not be a good fit for you, as they can make noise at any point during the day, and can be especially noisy at dawn and dusk. I would never recommend placing a bird in a home with a newborn.

Birds are messy. Thrown food, toy parts, feathers and feather dust are only of the few things you will contend with. Cage papers should be changed daily. Do you kids pick up after themselves? Will they be willing to pick up after a parrot?

They can bite and don’t often like to be handled. Birds are prey animals and as such are on high alert for perceived threats. I often get asked for a friendly, interactive bird who can be held or touched. Despite the charming photos you may see on the internet, parrots don’t do well if they are touched a lot. In fact, they can overly bond to one person, and not want to interact with – or may even attack – everyone else. Caretakers need a good understanding of body language and a willingness to leave a bird alone when he doesn’t want to be touched. How do your children play? Are they rough with other animals in the house? Birds are fragile creatures, and will not do well if they are grabbed, poked at, or played with roughly. Little fingers can slip between cage bars easily when you aren’t looking as well – another bite risk.

Parrots can live a long time. If the whole family is on board and willing to care for the bird, you will go a long way towards having a successful placement. However, if your kids lose interest in things quickly, and if you, as parents, aren’t willing to assume responsibility for them, a parrot may not be a good match.

Caring for parrots takes time. Between activities and school, do your kids have time to provide the daily care needed? Can they do the cleaning, feeding, providing enrichment and spending time together required – or are they over scheduled as it is?

Birds need to get out of the cage. Can you provide a safe environment and allow out of cage time daily?

Birds need lots to do. Intelligent and busy, parrots need enrichment in the form of toys, a cage with multiple perches, and out of cage perches and play gyms to keep those big brains occupied.

Birds can fly away. Do your kids forget to close the door? We have had numerous bird fly away, never to be seen again, because of this.

Other pets can hurt or kill them. Can your kids keep dogs and cats away from a parrot? It only takes a second for an animal’s prey drive to kick in, ending in heartbreaking results.

Birds thrive in homes where the whole family is committed to providing care,where kids are old enough to understand when and when not to interact. Safe and fun interactions can include:

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Playing games. Parrots love to throw, toss and drop objects, some will even fetch!

Singing and dancing. Many birds love music and respond to it happily, especially when humans get loud and silly. It’s a great way to encourage exercise for all involved.

Making toys with cheap items around the house. Kris Porter’s Parrot Enrichment and Activity book  is a free download with lots of great ideas.

Training. Teaching birds to target, turn around, flap on cue or fly to a perch can be a great way for your child to learn how to develop trust with a parrot. Training is clear communication, and rewards can be delivered on a spoon or dropped in a cup as trainers and learners gain confidence.

Learning about birds in the wild. Encouraging your child to understand that parrots are very few generations removed from their native habitats can lead to an interest in conservation, ecology, biology, and veterinary studies.

Cooking together. Parrots need a wide variety of healthy food to thrive. Your child may wish to try new foods that you make for your bird, and we have lots of great recipies in the Nourish to Flourish cookbook.

At Phoenix Landing, we provide you with information based on having placed over 2900 birds in homes, If you are still unsure if a parrot is the right choice, please send us an email, or complete an application to foster a bird at no cost to you other than food. If it does not work out, we take the bird back.

Peg’s Second Chance

How an Eclectus with an amputated foot brought a hopeful end to the year
Peg Eclectus2
“An 18-week old female Eclectus was brought in today…” the veterinarian from SEAVS in Fairfax, VA said, as we spoke on the phone. “The bird’s right foot needs to be amputated and the owners did not want to pay for the surgery.”

The vet needed to find an experienced person who could care for the as-yet-unnamed female Eclectus. Someone needed to help post-surgery to medicate her and bring her back multiple times for follow-ups. Additionally, she needed to be weaned. An Eclectus should wean in no longer than 6 months. At four and a half months, this little one needed to transition to solid food.

The vet needed to find someone quickly, as her dead foot needed to be removed.  Could Phoenix Landing take her on?  Of course.

But who could take on the care of this very young, special needs parrot? Debbie, our MD adoption coordinator, stepped up to help.

First, the bird needed to survive the surgery. “We will try to leave as much of her leg as possible,” the vet assured me.

How did this happen to such a young bird? Caretaker neglect. A towel was wrapped around her leg and it was not removed for at least two weeks. Though many birds play with towels, or shred them when nesty, towels are not good toys. We have known birds who have ingested tiny bits of indigestible fabric, to the point where their digestive system was impacted and they died. Please be careful if you give your parrot a towel to play with, and always supervise.

About an hour later, the vet called and said the surgery was successful. They would care for her overnight, but the most important thing now was that she eat.

“She can’t leave until we know she is eating. We had to tube feed her.” We would talk the next day to see how she was doing.

Peg Eclectus

Peg, post-surgery at Debbie’s house, and now eating a wide variety of healthy foods!

The vet advised how to set up a cage for her. Her cage should be short, with lots of padding on the bottom. She would do well with flat perches. “She will probably adjust well to the missing foot, as she is so young,” the vet said. An Eclectus can live to be 40 years old.

It amazes me how resilient parrots are. This one was exceptional. Imagine the pain and fear this poor bird suffered in its short life. How could she ever trust humans? Native to Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and Autstralia, in the wild she would have already fledged (at 11 weeks). She would be foraging for fruits in the tops of rain forest trees. When she reaches sexual maturity between 2 and 3 years, her behavior will change drastically. She would be the queen of a harem of friendly males, a relationship described by academics as cooperative polyandry. She would sit in a hole in a tree for up to 11 months of the year, while males brought her food and helped her create and care for her clutches of 2 eggs. But instead of this life, she is in captivity, now missing a foot, and her future is uncertain.  But we will do the best we can by her. As often quoted from The Little Prince, “You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.”

The next day brought good news: the little one was walking, and was not messing with her bandages. She did not need a collar. Additionally, she was eating a little. She would be ready to go that evening.

Peg Eclectus3

But what should we call her? Debbie said, “Peg!” Debbie then made the 2 hour round trip journey to pick her up, and Peg is on the road to recovery.  She will need to stay on medications and have several bandage changes before we can look for her adopting home.  Stay tuned for an update!

Learning from life with a foster parrot

By Carrie J. Sidener, Foster for Phoenix Landing

It’s been a month since Simon moved in.

This is roughly the halfway point in our foster relationship to determine if this particular little green quaker parrot is a good fit in my home and if my home is a good fit for him. If everything works out, this relationship between us will become a permanent one.

Here are a few things I’ve learned about Simon in this short period of time, in no particular order:

1. I’ve given him the nickname “The Flying Alarm Clock.” He yells as he flies, in the same pattern and roughly the same tone as an alarm clock. Why? I have no idea, but he certainly can’t sneak up on you.

2. Put corn, carrots, peas and scrambled eggs in front of this boy, and he will tear it up. What he won’t touch are some of my personal favorites — just about any berries. He likes apples, but I don’t really care for them.

And he likes cold things. He’ll shake his head when the cold touches his tongue, but will reach for more.

3. Simon is a bird that hasn’t learned how to relax. When he is awake and away from his cage, he is perpetually trying to groom me as though he wants to make sure all my feathers are straight and looking good.

I hate to tell him my feathers — or rather my hair — is always out of place and no semblance of grooming will fix it.

Also, he has some weird obsession with my ears.

4. This little guy is very social, which has endeared him into the hearts of the friends and family who have met him thus far. He loves to have his head scratched and will head butt you if your focus lapses on those wonderful head scratches.

Simon Quaker 20175. Simon has gained a particular attachment and affection for me. When his cage door is open, Simon becomes my little shadow. One morning last week, he ended up clutching my dress at the hip as I prepared his food and packed my lunch.

I managed to snag a photograph of him looking very much like a child clutched to my leg, begging me not to go to work.

6. Simon came to me with a fear of water and while there are a number of suggestions to combat this, I chose what I’m now calling the “Dance Party Method.”

In this method, I bring Simon into the bathroom and let him perch on the top of the shower door so he can watch as I take a shower. But here’s the thing — we have a dance party, and slowly Simon has allowed me to bring him into the shower with the water running. We still have to dance and sing and play, but as long as the energy remains high, he’s OK with it.

I’m a little concerned that I may bust a move a little too vigorously and end up falling in the shower, but so far so good.

7. Simon is a bobber. He will vigorously nod his head up and down to express his happiness or to ask me for something. It’s really adorable, and I’m considering teaching him to do this on command to somehow make it into a trick. Any suggestions?Simon Quaker2 2017

Also, I’m pretty sure I can teach him to dance.

8. He loves to whistle. And he will use his skills to challenge people to a game of Simon Says. Most of the time he wins, but he’s never beaten me.

That’s because I can’t play. I never learned how to whistle.

9. So far, Simon has been a man of few words. The only thing I’ve managed to decipher from him is “Step Up.”

Maybe he’ll say more or maybe he won’t. I don’t really care. He’s a pretty great companion, just as he is.

First published on May 9, 2017 in Lynchburg, VA by The News & Advance

Adoptable Bird Pairs

Birds will often make friends with other birds. When the relationship is safe (they don’t hurt each other), and they aren’t mating, we like to see them enjoy their lives together. After all, having someone else in your family that looks, thinks and acts like you can be comforting and entertaining. Can you imagine being the only human?

Here are just a few of our bird pairs/friends looking for their next good home through Phoenix Landing. While they certainly enjoy and benefit from each other’s company, they can enjoy a human family’s time and attention too. Since people cannot mate with parrots, and we shouldn’t over-snuggle, stroke or pet them anyway, having two birds that keep each other good company makes for a healthier and happier household for everyone.

Here are a few of our current adoptable pairs, and there are several others of various species waiting for our help.

TORI and GABRIELLE are nanday conures. Their age is unknown but they’ve been together at least seven years. They are dedicated companions, snuggling every night. During the day, Tori is pleased to fly around and spend time exploring. Gabrielle always stays on or in the cage, and has a more cautious nature. Tori will land on your shoulder if you’re a trusted person, but Gabrielle prefers her personal space. We think they’re adorable, especially their little red ankles.

Tori Gabrielle

QUORK, a scarlet macaw, and BETSY, a military macaw, came from a rather horrid place many years ago. Their ages are unknown. They were not companions then but now they are cage mates and best buddies. Their past was left behind long ago and all that matters to them now is that they have places to go and things to do, keeping them mentally and physically active. They are terrific eaters of a wide variety of healthy foods. Quork will chatter upon occasion, and knows his name. He likes to have his tongue touched at bedtime. GIZMO is a 24 year old blue and gold macaw that likes to hang out with Quork and Betsy, and these three go together to an outside aviary almost every day. Macaws are so enchanting. Just watching their antics is usually more than satisfying.

GizmoQuorkBetsy

PIP SQUEEK, a 14 year old sun conure, and SWEET PEA, an 18 year old nanday conure, are a charming pair. They very much appreciate their human family too, especially Pip. She’s the first to come out and seek family interaction and easily hops up hoping for a walk about the house and an adventure. Pea is a bit more of a homebody, but he adores Pip. You may wonder why Pip is so bald. We wonder too. The feather follicles have long gone, and she’s been tested for every possible medical problem.  Her medical workups are always excellent.  She is just unique!

Pip and Pea

OLLIE, an 8 year old blue and gold macaw and LAYLA an 11 year old scarlet macaw are entertaining to say the least. They have been together for almost 8 years. Ollie is a boisterous, happy and clever macaw. He loves to trick train and even knows when to say “good!” Layla is very attached to Ollie and doesn’t like for him to be out of sight. They will often bicker, or maybe they are just having a significant discussion, but they love a bit of drama. We’re glad they have each other to keep life engaging for both.

Ollie and Layla on Atom

ESSIE is a 17 year old greenwing macaw and URSIE is an 18 year old blue and gold macaw. These two would fit best into a home where they are allowed lots of time outside the cage. They love sitting on a tree stand, and especially enjoy looking out the window. They entertain and take care of each other while you enjoy and admire their beautiful parrot dynamics. They relish their Harrison’s pellets and most any fresh fruits and vegetables. Ursie and Essie especially love almonds and walnuts in the shell. Like many birds, they are not very interested in being touched, but that’s OK.

Ursie and Essie

If you’re fascinated by birds and interested in adopting a pair, please go to our web site at phoenixlanding.org where you can learn more about our adoption and education program.   And don’t forget, birds don’t have to be bonded pairs like the ones listed here to enjoy simply having another bird in the family!

Birds Need Bird Friends Too

“Young birds are easy” as Liz Wilson used to say, to make a point.  It’s true.  They are eager and generally compliant. When sexual maturity rolls around, behavior and relationships may start to change. Remember your teenage years?

For parrots, natural behavior changes can mean that a favorite person or bird must be fiercely protected; Amazons are notorious for this. Cockatoos, especially males, can be highly unpredictable or will clamp onto you and try to bite when you put them down. Macaws will raise their wings in defense of whomever they are trying to protect (maybe teaching the “eagle” trick is not such a good idea?). Other behaviors could include charging the perceived interloper, screaming for more attention and interaction, nesting, egg laying and yes, masturbation.

Harley

Oftentimes, people are not willing to adjust their own behavior and expectations in order to live with a sexually mature parrot. Sometimes the advice is to get the bird a mate, or find it a new home, or punish it (yikes). Other times, the parrot is relegated permanently to its cage or to a back room, both less than optimal outcomes for the bird that is simply following its nature. Don’t get me wrong, there are positive ways of coping with these behaviors successfully; however, the number of sexually mature birds is usually greater than the number of people willing to learn how to live harmoniously with them.

Jake Tink

As a rehoming organization that never has enough homes for the birds needing our help, Phoenix Landing does not advocate simply providing a mate for a sexually mature bird. If all captive parrots started making more babies, we’d have an even greater homeless problem.

Tiels

However, birds living in captivity certainly deserve to follow their natures to the greatest extent possible, and one very important part of a parrot’s nature is the desire to have other bird friends. Some wild parrots live in large flocks, others live in small family groups; but all wild parrots live with other parrots to some extent. These social groups help to keep them safe from predation, and maximize their ability to find food, nests and other important resources. For this reason, Phoenix Landing does advocate that birds not live alone in households (in most cases).

Fred (BGM) keeping Peter (GWM) company in the hospital

Fred (blue and gold) keeping Peter (greenwing) company in the hospital

Here then lies the problem – many people want a parrot because of their expectations of what the parrot provides in that relationship; and when a young, “easy” bird grows up, they start to express their needs in the relationship also. But we are not their mates or parents, so we have to learn to have an appropriate relationship with them, primarily as their friends. They probably deserve some bird friends too.

Ollie and LaylaHaving more than one bird can be a space, time and finance challenge, but it can also be easier for everyone. Birds learn from each other, often teaching their friends how to eat better food, shower or play with toys.  They entertain each other, taking some of the burden off of the humans.  They don’t need to live in the same cage to enjoy all the benefits of having birdie friends.  Since even the smallest parrots should live a long time, it’s important that we find ways to sustain a long-term relationship for everyone.  Stay tuned next month for some stories of Phoenix Landing bird friendships, including some of our adoptable birds!

Smokie, Our 2,500th Adoptable Bird

Welcome Smokie! You are the 2,500th bird to enter the Phoenix Landing adoption program.

Smokie 2500th

Smokie was a very important member of his first family for 24 years.   He spent most of every day with his favorite person, but recently lost her to illness.   While we wish to keep our birds “forever,” that is rarely possible.   Not only should most birds live a long time, longer than our children stay at home, but our own lives can change very quickly due to health, finances, relationships, time and interest. So now Smokie is an important member of the Phoenix Landing family.

WHY BIRDS NEED NEW HOMES
With 2,500 birds now in our system, we can give you a pretty good idea about why most birds need new homes.   The most common reason: “not enough time and attention.”   If you live with a bird, you know that they are highly social creatures and require a bit more care than most other pets (cleaning and feeding for starters). It is hard to sustain any relationship, but especially when an animal is physically and mentally dependent on us for much of their daily lives.

The good news – birds are very resilient and adaptable. This means they can get through tough times with us. It also means they can learn to flourish in new places when needed.

FINDING NEW HOMES
Now comes the hard part. While every bird deserves to have a succession of good homes, finding new homes is not easy.   First we have to overcome concerns about a bird’s history and misconceptions about adoption. Phoenix Landing believes that every bird is adoptable, no matter their past; and even those few parrots that are truly “rescued” from negative situations can go on to lead healthy and happy lives.

BrandyOneWingOne-Winged Brandy Now Flourishes in an Aviary Most of the Year

Second, living with a bird is just different. Many of you reading this understand that what makes parrots different is also what makes them magical, entertaining, compelling and wonderful. You also know that extra effort and time is involved, not to mention financial resources, space, family cooperation, trust-building skills and a dedication to learning.   Parrots are not for everyone, and there are far more birds needing a place to live than there are places for them.

HOW OUR ADOPTION PROGRAM WORKS
The Phoenix Landing philosophy, first and foremost, is to look out for the bird’s best interests – not only when they first come to us, but over their entire lives.

When a bird enters our system, they are initially in foster care. Sometimes this is with a foster family just helping on a short-term basis. However, most birds are placed with a family that is hoping to adopt. The foster period, about 2 months, gives everyone, especially the bird, a chance to know each other and see if it is a good match. If it is, and the bird is adopted, our adoption contract stipulates that the bird remains under the legal protection of Phoenix Landing, and WHEN (not IF in most cases) they need their next good home, Phoenix Landing will be responsible for this placement.

TinkTink, Lilac Crown Amazon Looking for His 2nd Phoenix Landing Home

If you live with and love a bird, then you can understand why we are so adamant about looking after a bird for its entire life, not just its next placement.   EACH home should be a good one.

2,500 IS REALLY MORE LIKE 3,500
So, taking in 2,500 birds since our adoption program began in 2003 does not mean that we have found 2,500 homes. Oh no, it’s far more than that – closer to 3,500. In addition to some temporary foster homes, about 15% of our birds have already needed more than one adoptive home.

THE GREAT PEOPLE THAT MAKE IT HAPPEN
Finding new families, screening applicants, teaching classes, moving birds, going to the vet, following up after adoption — that’s a lot of work by our incredibly dedicated volunteers who work so hard, in addition to their own jobs and families. These remarkable individuals can never be thanked enough for all they do, but a well-placed parrot in a new home is one of the best rewards possible!

Volunteers PLJust a Few of Our Many Amazing Volunteers

Maybe you would like to be part of the solution and offer a bird a new place to land? We always have 150 or more birds waiting for our help, or some of the 2,500 that have already been adopted often need their next good home. If you have the time, resources and the willingness to learn, we’d love to hear from you.

Or if you already have a bird and just want to learn more about living with and caring for parrots, we offer many informative classes. If your bird is going to be with you for a long time, learning new things and sharing ideas will keep life interesting for both of you!

For more information about our adoption and education program, go to phoenixlanding.org.