The Wild Magical Parrots of Peru

Our 2016 ecotour took us back to the beautiful rainforest of Peru along the Tambopata River, and time with one of our favorite conservation and research scientists, Dr. Donald Brightsmith. Seeing parrots in the wild always leaves me with mixed feelings – to see birds flying, interacting and responding to their native environment is majestic and overwhelmingly beautiful. On the other hand, I feel so frustrated by the limitations placed on the captive parrots in our homes. No matter how much space, enrichment and opportunity we give them, it just doesn’t compare. However, after viewing the antics and busyness of wild parrots, we can’t help but be inspired to do more for the birds in our homes.

Here are some photos and movies from our trip. I hope these give you some new ideas about how to make life better for your parrot.

Thanks to the group that joined us for this trip, we were able to make a donation of $3,750 to Dr. Brightsmith for his work at the Macaw Project at the Tambopata Research Center. It’s important that we help conserve areas where wild parrots can thrive, and also learn as much as possible about their way of life. Please help support conservation and research for wild parrots! We also hope you’ll join us on a future ecotour, we will be planning another one soon.

This video includes mealy Amazons, blue headed pionus and severe macaws at the Chuncho claylick: youtu.be/WOvbU8MlO3E.

Here is a video of a greenwing macaw and a blue and gold macaw having a “discussion.” They hang from the branch and hold each other’s feet.https://youtu.be/996f2oSPaHw. Thanks to Angie Yeung from Celltei.com for this amazing video!

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Blue headed pionus parrots

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Greenwing and scarlet macaws at the Chunco claylick along the Tambopata River

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Greenwing, scarlet and blue and gold macaws at the claylick

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Two blue and gold macaws.  What might they be discussing?

What Is A Prolapsed Cloaca?

By Debbie Russell, Maryland Adoption Coordinator

A cloacal prolapse is a condition where the inner tissues of the cloaca protrude and fall out of the vent. The cloaca is the end of the digestive track, where the bird excretes urates, feces, urine, genital products and even eggs. Did you know that both male and female birds can prolapse? It’s most common is cockatoos, but any bird could have it happen to them. If you have never seen it before it’s very shocking when you do!

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Kiki, male umbrella cockatoo. Came to Phoenix Landing in 2009. Survived 3 years.

There are many reasons a cloaca is strained to the point of prolapse, but the most common reasons are sexual over-stimulation, holding feces for too long, papillomatosis (a virus), excessive egg laying, and even a bad diet. Most commonly, people touch their birds in inappropriate ways, sending sexual signals to the bird that cannot be completed, leading to chronic mastubatory behavior. Since we are not our bird’s mates, this behavior can cause many physical and behavior problems. It doesn’t mean we cannot enjoy a close bond and companionship with our birds, but we should encourage independent play and activities. Not only will this help prevent some of the physical problems, like prolapse, but it can also help with other problems like dysfunctional screaming or biting.

So what is the best way to touch a bird? Only touching your parrot on the head and feet is the recommended approach. You should never touch them down the back or under the tail. Yes, sometimes we just want to snuggle or “pet” them, and it feels good — but it feels TOO good for your bird and can put them at risk.

Timmy TAG1 prolapse 2009

Once, a prolapse occurs over an extended period, it usually requires invasive surgery. Simply reducing the vent area with sutures rarely works at that point. Surgery is not cheap and there is no guarantee that it will work either. The veterinarian opens the parrot’s abdomen, pulls the cloaca back up, and then attaches it to the parrot’s rib and abdomen wall. This doesn’t always work if the cloaca has lost it’s elasticity or the bird continues to be over-stimulated sexually.

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Rib Tuck Surgery to Address Prolapsed Cloaca

Just this week, Phoenix Landing was asked to help a little male black-capped Caique, Mooshie. This poor bird has been prolapsed for years and it recently got worse. The family could not afford the surgery.  The veterinarian visit and surgery with Stahl Exotic Animal Veterinary Services (SEAVS) was arranged before the bird was picked up, and Dr. Stahl performed the surgery on Tuesday.  Mooshie’s surgery went well, and we are cautiously optimistic!

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Mooshie, Male Caique

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Mooshie’s Prolapse

Want to help? Make sure you have an appropriate relationship with your bird – which means being a friend not a mate; teach positive behaviors like independent play and foraging; provide a good diet with plenty of calcium and vitamin A rich foods; always provide access to elimination at all times (no potty training!); and make sure your bird has regular visits with a good avian veterinarian. If you’d like to help us with Mooshie’s surgery and continuing care, click here!

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