Kevin Blaylock, One Of A Kind

Kevin was supremely devoted to his family – his wife Kami and their children Chandler and Maddi. I remember when they joined us for a parrot care class back in July 2006, soon after they acquired their first bird, a macaw. We were so impressed with their dedication to learning right from the start, especially because the whole family was involved. For Kevin, family was everything.

DSC_0187 copyOver the years, as Kevin became more involved with Phoenix Landing, we felt like his lucky adopted family. We went on ecotour vacations together, many of which he had adeptly organized. Beginning in 2010, we spent several weekends a year teaching intense training “Step-Up” workshops. Kevin never missed one of these workshops, because he so enjoyed the time with new students and old friends.

Kevin helped us with countless projects – especially at The Landing, our only facility. StepUpKevinWhen in doubt, we would say “let’s ask Kevin” because he usually had a new and insightful idea. As a highly successful businessman, Kevin joined the Board of Directors as our Treasurer and he knew how to steer the organization solidly into the future. Lastly, Kevin took stunning photographs of amazing wild and captive parrots, something that gave him great joy and satisfaction. His love for birds just radiates through these photos.

 

Kevin’s dedication to helping parrots was monumental. Avid learners become good teachers, and Kevin was one of our best, with a special interest in behavior. He also put his positive reinforcement training skills to work in every aspect of his life, always seeing the good in everyone.

 

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Kevin’s family lost him way too soon, he was a young 44 years old. His Phoenix Landing family lost one of its brightest young stars. There are no words to convey the void Kevin leaves behind – one of goodwill, smiles and genuine affection for all those he befriended. I hope you are able to fly in your new life, Kevin, because we know how much you deserve the joy that would bring you! ~ Love always, Ann

Learning from life with a foster parrot

By Carrie J. Sidener, Foster for Phoenix Landing

It’s been a month since Simon moved in.

This is roughly the halfway point in our foster relationship to determine if this particular little green quaker parrot is a good fit in my home and if my home is a good fit for him. If everything works out, this relationship between us will become a permanent one.

Here are a few things I’ve learned about Simon in this short period of time, in no particular order:

1. I’ve given him the nickname “The Flying Alarm Clock.” He yells as he flies, in the same pattern and roughly the same tone as an alarm clock. Why? I have no idea, but he certainly can’t sneak up on you.

2. Put corn, carrots, peas and scrambled eggs in front of this boy, and he will tear it up. What he won’t touch are some of my personal favorites — just about any berries. He likes apples, but I don’t really care for them.

And he likes cold things. He’ll shake his head when the cold touches his tongue, but will reach for more.

3. Simon is a bird that hasn’t learned how to relax. When he is awake and away from his cage, he is perpetually trying to groom me as though he wants to make sure all my feathers are straight and looking good.

I hate to tell him my feathers — or rather my hair — is always out of place and no semblance of grooming will fix it.

Also, he has some weird obsession with my ears.

4. This little guy is very social, which has endeared him into the hearts of the friends and family who have met him thus far. He loves to have his head scratched and will head butt you if your focus lapses on those wonderful head scratches.

Simon Quaker 20175. Simon has gained a particular attachment and affection for me. When his cage door is open, Simon becomes my little shadow. One morning last week, he ended up clutching my dress at the hip as I prepared his food and packed my lunch.

I managed to snag a photograph of him looking very much like a child clutched to my leg, begging me not to go to work.

6. Simon came to me with a fear of water and while there are a number of suggestions to combat this, I chose what I’m now calling the “Dance Party Method.”

In this method, I bring Simon into the bathroom and let him perch on the top of the shower door so he can watch as I take a shower. But here’s the thing — we have a dance party, and slowly Simon has allowed me to bring him into the shower with the water running. We still have to dance and sing and play, but as long as the energy remains high, he’s OK with it.

I’m a little concerned that I may bust a move a little too vigorously and end up falling in the shower, but so far so good.

7. Simon is a bobber. He will vigorously nod his head up and down to express his happiness or to ask me for something. It’s really adorable, and I’m considering teaching him to do this on command to somehow make it into a trick. Any suggestions?Simon Quaker2 2017

Also, I’m pretty sure I can teach him to dance.

8. He loves to whistle. And he will use his skills to challenge people to a game of Simon Says. Most of the time he wins, but he’s never beaten me.

That’s because I can’t play. I never learned how to whistle.

9. So far, Simon has been a man of few words. The only thing I’ve managed to decipher from him is “Step Up.”

Maybe he’ll say more or maybe he won’t. I don’t really care. He’s a pretty great companion, just as he is.

First published on May 9, 2017 in Lynchburg, VA by The News & Advance

The Wild Magical Parrots of Peru

Our 2016 ecotour took us back to the beautiful rainforest of Peru along the Tambopata River, and time with one of our favorite conservation and research scientists, Dr. Donald Brightsmith. Seeing parrots in the wild always leaves me with mixed feelings – to see birds flying, interacting and responding to their native environment is majestic and overwhelmingly beautiful. On the other hand, I feel so frustrated by the limitations placed on the captive parrots in our homes. No matter how much space, enrichment and opportunity we give them, it just doesn’t compare. However, after viewing the antics and busyness of wild parrots, we can’t help but be inspired to do more for the birds in our homes.

Here are some photos and movies from our trip. I hope these give you some new ideas about how to make life better for your parrot.

Thanks to the group that joined us for this trip, we were able to make a donation of $3,750 to Dr. Brightsmith for his work at the Macaw Project at the Tambopata Research Center. It’s important that we help conserve areas where wild parrots can thrive, and also learn as much as possible about their way of life. Please help support conservation and research for wild parrots! We also hope you’ll join us on a future ecotour, we will be planning another one soon.

This video includes mealy Amazons, blue headed pionus and severe macaws at the Chuncho claylick: youtu.be/WOvbU8MlO3E.

Here is a video of a greenwing macaw and a blue and gold macaw having a “discussion.” They hang from the branch and hold each other’s feet.https://youtu.be/996f2oSPaHw. Thanks to Angie Yeung from Celltei.com for this amazing video!

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Blue headed pionus parrots

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Greenwing and scarlet macaws at the Chunco claylick along the Tambopata River

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Greenwing, scarlet and blue and gold macaws at the claylick

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Two blue and gold macaws.  What might they be discussing?

What Is A Prolapsed Cloaca?

By Debbie Russell, Maryland Adoption Coordinator

A cloacal prolapse is a condition where the inner tissues of the cloaca protrude and fall out of the vent. The cloaca is the end of the digestive track, where the bird excretes urates, feces, urine, genital products and even eggs. Did you know that both male and female birds can prolapse? It’s most common is cockatoos, but any bird could have it happen to them. If you have never seen it before it’s very shocking when you do!

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Kiki, male umbrella cockatoo. Came to Phoenix Landing in 2009. Survived 3 years.

There are many reasons a cloaca is strained to the point of prolapse, but the most common reasons are sexual over-stimulation, holding feces for too long, papillomatosis (a virus), excessive egg laying, and even a bad diet. Most commonly, people touch their birds in inappropriate ways, sending sexual signals to the bird that cannot be completed, leading to chronic mastubatory behavior. Since we are not our bird’s mates, this behavior can cause many physical and behavior problems. It doesn’t mean we cannot enjoy a close bond and companionship with our birds, but we should encourage independent play and activities. Not only will this help prevent some of the physical problems, like prolapse, but it can also help with other problems like dysfunctional screaming or biting.

So what is the best way to touch a bird? Only touching your parrot on the head and feet is the recommended approach. You should never touch them down the back or under the tail. Yes, sometimes we just want to snuggle or “pet” them, and it feels good — but it feels TOO good for your bird and can put them at risk.

Timmy TAG1 prolapse 2009

Once, a prolapse occurs over an extended period, it usually requires invasive surgery. Simply reducing the vent area with sutures rarely works at that point. Surgery is not cheap and there is no guarantee that it will work either. The veterinarian opens the parrot’s abdomen, pulls the cloaca back up, and then attaches it to the parrot’s rib and abdomen wall. This doesn’t always work if the cloaca has lost it’s elasticity or the bird continues to be over-stimulated sexually.

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Rib Tuck Surgery to Address Prolapsed Cloaca

Just this week, Phoenix Landing was asked to help a little male black-capped Caique, Mooshie. This poor bird has been prolapsed for years and it recently got worse. The family could not afford the surgery.  The veterinarian visit and surgery with Stahl Exotic Animal Veterinary Services (SEAVS) was arranged before the bird was picked up, and Dr. Stahl performed the surgery on Tuesday.  Mooshie’s surgery went well, and we are cautiously optimistic!

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Mooshie, Male Caique

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Mooshie’s Prolapse

Want to help? Make sure you have an appropriate relationship with your bird – which means being a friend not a mate; teach positive behaviors like independent play and foraging; provide a good diet with plenty of calcium and vitamin A rich foods; always provide access to elimination at all times (no potty training!); and make sure your bird has regular visits with a good avian veterinarian. If you’d like to help us with Mooshie’s surgery and continuing care, click here!

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